Month: July 2016

My very own rest home inside the brain

  In which the jabbering residents of my interior rest home duke it out.   I’ve got my very own rest home inside my skull, with at least five residents. When I try to Think with a capital T about how to prepare for growing old, their voices drown me out. Jabber jabber jabber! Depressa: It’s […]

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Very very good is good enough

I am forever amazed at the barrage of self-help material urging us to aim for the top, follow our dreams, and especially to be better than everyone else. Just a minute: how can everyone be the best? I figured out the maths around 1972, when New Zealand’s favourite poet, Sam Hunt, told me that female poets (unlike male poets) […]

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How scary is old age?

  In which I contemplate the relative scariness of a first pregnancy and old age.   Preparing for old age is the scariest thing I have ever done in my life. Scarier than gliding. Scarier than windsurfing in a gale. Scarier than reading poems to an audience of 2000. Scarier than reading poems to the […]

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My boot camp for the bonus years

In which I bully myself into making 12 lifestyle changes in a single year, to increase my health and happiness in old age and reduce the chances of getting dementia. This is an account of my personal boot camp to prepare myself for the extra years—the bonus years that we never expected or desired—the years […]

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What to do after a big faux pas

What do you do when you make a big fat typo in an email? Blush and own it? This cannot be right — usually, least said soonest mended, surely? Well, yesterday I put my foot in it good and proper. In 2008 I helped to establish a group called Plain English Power, and we worked hard for our goals. Eight years on, we […]

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