How to be old—we're all learning

12. Final comments of the older bloggers: new, overlooked, and underlined thoughts

Some older bloggers saved their best comments for last

The Older Bloggers Survey covered a lot of factors, but inevitably excluded others. So we asked one final question, and found that many participants saved their most important comments for last.

Q. 22. Do you have any further comments about your experience as a blogger? We’re interested in anything you’d like to share on this topic.

New points were raised, and previous ones emphasised, so it was well worthwhile asking for further input. I assume that our older bloggers must have felt strongly about these points to add yet another comment, when they had already answered 22 questions, often in depth. So in one sense this open-ended question carries special weight.

Problems, problems: state them here

Participants raised several problematic aspects of blogging: the pressure, the footprint, the conflict, the trolls… While the complete survey shows that on the whole, older people get satisfaction and enjoyment from blogging, that is not the whole picture.

One commenter found a solution to the pressure created by blogging: a different platform, Micro.blog.

Changes in the blogging culture

Some comments were about changes people have perceived in the blogging culture—changes for the worse.

A couple of operational points

Joy of blogging: new points

Comments that reinforce the value of pleasure, community, self expression and learning

Many of the final comments reinforced themes that had already become clear through responses to earlier questions. Enjoyment, community, self expression and learning scored high throughout this survey as reasons to blog, benefits from blogging, and feelings about blogging— and now respondents made their point once more. Some examples:

Comments about the value of blogging for older and isolated people

A modern retirement village with all options for a satisfactory old age?

Unprompted, many participants commented on ways that blogging can help people as they age, or if they are isolated by geography or illness.

Two older writers explain in detail why they find blogging a good fit for this later stage of life:

Glad to take the survey

Finally, I was delighted to find appreciative comments about the survey itself. This is not something I expected! Such courtesy is in tune with the generosity of the older bloggers who did this survey—thank you all!