The bonus years are upon me

Advertisements

23 thoughts on “The bonus years are upon me

  1. I’m a few years younger than you, but close enough that I’m an instant fan, not only for the subject matter, but for how easy you make it to read, not only in the presentation but in the writing. I know I’m going to enjoy checking in with your blogs every chance I get.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I have multiple family members that lived past 102. Grew up around a lot of elderly people – who were very active mentally and physically. When they got to about mid 90’s we/the cousins would start suggesting they let someone else drive – although they still were quite alert and capable. We insisted no long road trips, though. My parents visited New Zealand in their 70’s Dad said it was probably one of his favorite places – they traveled a lot during retirement
    I’m not much younger than you, but hey, age and years is relative. I know some people much younger that are really “old”. Age is a complex situation – fascinating. Will be interested in your muses on it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. What an interesting family. I’m guessing you may have the longevity gene, in which case you are bound to live long regardless of your habits, good or bad. You’re right, age is not a simple matter (despite many a comforting truism) and I guess am bound to think about it a little more yet.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Genetics plays a part, but if you misuse/don’t protect what you have, you won’t get optimum performance and life span. Nothing is certain. Lifestyles, environments, and diets have really changed from previous generations. It will be interesting to see how this generation does (I am the youngest of this one) and how the ones younger do. A brave new world indeed.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m staring at your comment. I’m taking it in. I’m feeling it in my bones from top to toe. This is one comment I refuse to rush away from. Nothing is more important than taking time to relish this message from a distant, unknown friend, herself a wise and skilful writer. Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the plaits! Don’t you think that old school photos were some of the best records ever. Probably because there weren’t any other ones! I love to look through old albums and see what, perhaps, has been written on the back of photos. I wonder if our 70 something grandchildren will sit around a computer screen to view old selfies?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Strangely, plaits were my mother’s way of doing the hair of six daughters each morning at lightning speed. Labour intensive but they stayed in place all day. Yes, photos of any sort were rare when we were children. Maybe 100 over the first 10 years of my life? Mostly with sisters or friends! Now I relish my iPhone — and I’m only just learning to manage all the photos I take. As for selfie parties, culling 99% be required!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi, couldn’t find a way to comment on your Ageing Tips post so thought I’d do it here. A nice attack on the beauty industry – heck, what’s wrong with your life experiences showing on your face? We must be under some kind of spell! Also good idea to credit the source of images at the end of the post, must try that myself. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dave, thanks for this! I suspect it’s the people who have NOT been especially worried about their appearance who find those changes so disconcerting. The changes disrupt our sense of identity: is this really me, this funny old body in the mirror? (The others started on surgery and so forth long ago.)
    I do try to credit all images, but colour photos on my blog are 99% my own efforts — that makes it easy 🙂

    Like

  6. Rachel, while I’m younger than you, I’m heading rapidly for 65, and many members of my family lived til 100+ Also, I was brought up by parents who were nearly forty years older than myself, so my attitude to older people has always been to see them – us – as just people. Like you, I detest ageism – more and more the older I get – particularly because inside I am not much different from how I was when young. It’s one of the things I want to look at in my own blog, in the future, and I do enjoy reading about it in other people’s blogs. It wasn’t what attracted first me to your blog (your thinking and writing style was the reason) but it’s an added bonus. Thank you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Val, I can see that there wouldn’t be room for ageism in such an extraordinary family pattern: that changes the game. I still find the aging process and attitudes to old age be mystifying and it’ll probably take me the next 23 years to figure them out. It’s great to know you’re out there reading what I write! Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’ve always followed the approach, ‘when in doubt, do a course’ but I find as I get older I have lost interest in that idea. I still do Qi Gong and singing, and other things but they are more continuing activities. I also volunteer in palliative care, where last week we were amused to be told we could no longer be employed over the age of ninety as insurance would no longer cover us.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you have got your own life well and truly sussed. I am more of a “when in doubt, write a book or teach a new course” sort of person. Your palliative care work sounds interesting. I’m not sure the 90-year limit qualifies as ageism. Or does it?

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s